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Command Line Interface (CLI)

Tauri enables your app to have a CLI through clap, a robust command line argument parser. With a simple CLI definition in your tauri.conf.json file, you can define your interface and read its argument matches map on JavaScript and/or Rust.

Supported Platforms

  • Windows
  • Linux
  • macOS

Setup

This plugin requires a Rust version of at least 1.75

Install the CLI plugin to get started.

Use your project’s package manager to add the dependency:

npm run tauri add cli

Base Configuration

Under tauri.conf.json, you have the following structure to configure the interface:

src-tauri/tauri.conf.json
{
"plugins": {
"cli": {
"description": "Tauri CLI Plugin Example",
"args": [
{
"short": "v",
"name": "verbose",
"description": "Verbosity level"
}
],
"subcommands": {
"run": {
"description": "Run the application",
"args": [
{
"name": "debug",
"description": "Run application in debug mode"
},
{
"name": "release",
"description": "Run application in release mode"
}
]
}
}
}
}
}

Adding Arguments

The args array represents the list of arguments accepted by its command or subcommand.

Positional Arguments

A positional argument is identified by its position in the list of arguments. With the following configuration:

src-tauri/tauri.conf.json
{
"args": [
{
"name": "source",
"index": 1,
"takesValue": true
},
{
"name": "destination",
"index": 2,
"takesValue": true
}
]
}

Users can run your app as ./app tauri.txt dest.txt and the arg matches map will define source as "tauri.txt" and destination as "dest.txt".

Named Arguments

A named argument is a (key, value) pair where the key identifies the value. With the following configuration:

tauri-src/tauri.conf.json
{
"args": [
{
"name": "type",
"short": "t",
"takesValue": true,
"multiple": true,
"possibleValues": ["foo", "bar"]
}
]
}

Users can run your app as ./app --type foo bar, ./app -t foo -t bar or ./app --type=foo,bar and the arg matches map will define type as ["foo", "bar"].

Flag Arguments

A flag argument is a standalone key whose presence or absence provides information to your application. With the following configuration:

tauri-src/tauri.conf.json
{
"args": [
{
"name": "verbose",
"short": "v"
}
]
}

Users can run your app as ./app -v -v -v, ./app --verbose --verbose --verbose or ./app -vvv and the arg matches map will define verbose as true, with occurrences = 3.

Subcommands

Some CLI applications have additional interfaces as subcommands. For instance, the git CLI has git branch, git commit and git push. You can define additional nested interfaces with the subcommands array:

tauri-src/tauri.conf.json
{
"cli": {
...
"subcommands": {
"branch": {
"args": []
},
"push": {
"args": []
}
}
}
}

Its configuration is the same as the root application configuration, with the description, longDescription, args, etc.

Usage

The CLI plugin is available in both JavaScript and Rust.

import { getMatches } from '@tauri-apps/plugin-cli';
const matches = await getMatches();
if (matches.subcommand?.name === 'run') {
// `./your-app run $ARGS` was executed
const args = matches.subcommand.matches.args;
if (args.debug?.value === true) {
// `./your-app run --debug` was executed
}
if (args.release?.value === true) {
// `./your-app run --release` was executed
}
}

Permissions

By default all plugin commands are blocked and cannot be accessed. You must define a list of permissions in your capabilities configuration.

See Access Control List for more information.

src-tauri/capabilities/main.json
{
"$schema": "../gen/schemas/desktop-schema.json",
"identifier": "main-capability",
"description": "Capability for the main window",
"windows": ["main"],
"permissions": ["cli:default"]
}
PermissionDescription
cli:defaultAllows reading the CLI matches.
cli:allow-cli-matchesEnables the cli_matches command without any pre-configured scope.
cli:deny-cli-matchesDenies the cli_matches command without any pre-configured scope.

© 2024 Tauri Contributors. CC-BY / MIT